Boomerang to beam your VMs

Recently I got an opportunity to take BoomerangTM for a spin. I wasn’t familiar with the product prior to this opportunity. Boomerang allows you to move your VMware vSphere workloads to Amazon AWS. It allows you to do the following:

  1. Move your load to AWS
  2. Use AWS as a DR or backup
  3. Bring your load back from AWS to your vSphere environment

Boomerang has a very simple deployment, perhaps which would explain the absence of countless PDFs on their website. The steps to get going are simple. You will need the following:

  1. A vSphere environment
  2. An AWS account
  3. Connectivity between 1 and 2

To get started, you will download an appliance which is right under 600MB. Once deployed, the appliance can be powered on. It will acquire an IP address if DHCP is enabled and publish that in the summary page of the appliance in the vSphere client. But if DHCP is not enabled, accessing the appliance becomes a little interesting. I found some details here. Luckily for me I have DHCP available and was simply able to hit the appliance acquired IP once it was up. The default username and password are both ‘admin’ and it would obviously make sense for you to change them to something else. When you provide the appliance with the default credentials, you will be asked to provide the license key and the email associated with it. This will also be a good opportunity for you to change your default password. With a few other choices to make you will be ready to rock and roll within seconds.

In the Boomerang world you have the option to create protection groups that serve as containers. These containers are made up of VMs. In order to create a protection group, you will need to provide the following:

  1. vSphere admin credentials
  2. vSphere IP/DNS
  3. AWS access key
  4. AWS secret key
  5. S3 Bucket name

Once you provide this information, you will be able to create a protection group. In my case I used a PHDVBA appliance I had laying around. My only reason for picking this versus others was its smaller disk footprint. It would have been relatively faster for me to move this to and from AWS considering my Internet connection is not the fastest. Read the rest of this entry »